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Dangosydd eitem ddigidol (DOI)

  • Benjamin J Gray
    Policy, Research and International Development, Public Health Wales NHS Trust, Cardiff, Wales.
  • Emma R Barton
    Policy, Research and International Development, Public Health Wales NHS Trust, Cardiff, Wales.
  • Alisha R Davies
    Policy, Research and International Development, Public Health Wales NHS Trust, Cardiff, Wales.
  • Sara J Long
    Centre for the Development and Evaluation of Complex Interventions for Public Health Improvement, Cardiff University, Cardiff, UK.
  • Janine Roderick
    Policy, Research and International Development, Public Health Wales NHS Trust, Cardiff, Wales.
  • Mark A Bellis
    Policy, Research and International Development, Public Health Wales NHS Trust, Cardiff, Wales.

BACKGROUND: To investigate whether sharing and linking routinely collected violence data across health and criminal justice systems can provide a more comprehensive understanding of violence, establish patterns of under-reporting and better inform the development, implementation and evaluation of violence prevention initiatives.

METHODS: Police violence with injury (VWI) crimed data and emergency department (ED) assault attendee data for South Wales were collected between 1 April 2014 and 31 March 2016 to examine the rates and patterns of VWI. Person identifiable data (PID) were cross-referenced to establish if certain victims or events were less likely to be reported to criminal justice services.

RESULTS: A total of 18 316 police crimed VWI victims and 10 260 individual ED attendances with an assault-related injury were considered. The majority of ED assault attendances (59.0%) were unknown to police. The key demographic identified as under-reporting to police were young males aged 18-34 years, while a significant amount of non-reported assaults involved a stranger. The combined monthly age-standardised rates were recalculated and on average were 74.7 (95% CI 72.1 to 77.2) and 66.1 (95% CI 64.0 to 68.2) per 100 000 population for males and females, respectively. Consideration of the additional ED cases resulted in a 35.3% and 18.1% increase on the original police totals for male and female VWI victims.

CONCLUSIONS: This study identified that violence is currently undermeasured, demonstrated the importance of continued sharing of routinely collected ED data and highlighted the benefits of using PID from a number of services in a linked way to provide a more comprehensive picture of violence.

Allweddeiriau

Iaith wreiddiolSaesneg
Tudalennau (o-i)1218-1224
Nifer y tudalennau7
CyfnodolynJournal of Epidemiology and Community Health
Cyfrol71
Rhif y cyfnodolyn12
Dyddiad ar-lein cynnar7 Tach 2017
Dynodwyr Gwrthrych Digidol (DOIs)
StatwsCyhoeddwyd - Rhag 2017
Cyhoeddwyd yn allanolIe
Gweld graff cysylltiadau