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Dangosydd eitem ddigidol (DOI)

  • Kathryn Ashton
    Policy, Research and International Development, Public Health Wales NHS Trust, Cardiff, Wales.
  • Mark A Bellis
    Policy, Research and International Development, Public Health Wales NHS Trust, Cardiff, Wales.
  • Alisha R Davies
    Policy, Research and International Development, Public Health Wales NHS Trust, Cardiff, Wales.
  • Karen Hughes
    Policy, Research and International Development, Public Health Wales NHS Trust, Cardiff, Wales.
  • Adam Winstock
    Department of Psychiatry, Psychiatry and Neuroscience, King's College London, Addiction Sciences Building, London, UK.

OBJECTIVES: To examine the emotions associated with drinking different types of alcohol, explore whether these emotions differ by sociodemographics and alcohol dependency and whether the emotions associated with different drink types influence people's choice of drinks in different settings.

DESIGN: International cross-sectional opportunistic survey (Global Drug Survey) using an online anonymous questionnaire in 11 languages promoted through newspapers, magazines and social media from November 2015 to January 2016.

STUDY POPULATION: Individuals aged 18-34 years who reported consumption of beer, spirits, red and white wine in the previous 12 months and were resident in countries with more than 200 respondents (n=21 countries; 29 836 respondents).

MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: Positive and negative emotions associated with consumption of different alcoholic beverages (energised, relaxed, sexy, confident, tired, aggressive, ill, restless and tearful) over the past 12 months in different settings.

RESULTS: Alcoholic beverages vary in the types of emotions individuals report they elicit, with spirits more frequently eliciting emotional changes of all types. Overall 29.8% of respondents reported feeling aggressive when drinking spirits, compared with only 7.1% when drinking red wine (p<0.001). Women more frequently reported feeling all emotions when drinking alcohol, apart from feelings of aggression. Respondents' level of alcohol dependency was strongly associated with feeling all emotions, with the likelihood of aggression being significantly higher in possible dependent versus low risk drinkers (adjusted OR 6.4; 95% CI 5.79 to 7.09; p<0.001). The odds of feeling the majority of positive and negative emotions also remained highest among dependent drinkers irrespective of setting.

CONCLUSION: Understanding emotions associated with alcohol consumption is imperative to addressing alcohol misuse, providing insight into what emotions influence drink choice between different groups in the population. The differences identified between sociodemographic groups and influences on drink choice within different settings will aid future public health practice to further comprehend individuals' drinking patterns and influence behaviour change.

Allweddeiriau

Iaith wreiddiolSaesneg
Tudalennau (o-i)e016089
CyfnodolynBMJ Open
Cyfrol7
Rhif y cyfnodolyn10
Dynodwyr Gwrthrych Digidol (DOIs)
StatwsCyhoeddwyd - 20 Tach 2017
Cyhoeddwyd yn allanolIe
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