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Interhemispheric transfer of post-amputation cortical plasticity within the human somatosensory cortex. / Valyear, Kenneth F; Philip, Benjamin A; Cirstea, Carmen M; Chen, Pin-Wei; Baune, Nathan; Marchal, Noah; Frey, Scott H.

Yn: Neuroimage, 19.10.2019.

Allbwn ymchwil: Cyfraniad at gyfnodolynErthygl

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APA

Valyear, K. F., Philip, B. A., Cirstea, C. M., Chen, P-W., Baune, N., Marchal, N., & Frey, S. H. (2019). Interhemispheric transfer of post-amputation cortical plasticity within the human somatosensory cortex. Neuroimage, [116291]. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.neuroimage.2019.116291

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Author

Valyear, Kenneth F ; Philip, Benjamin A ; Cirstea, Carmen M ; Chen, Pin-Wei ; Baune, Nathan ; Marchal, Noah ; Frey, Scott H. / Interhemispheric transfer of post-amputation cortical plasticity within the human somatosensory cortex. Yn: Neuroimage. 2019.

RIS

TY - JOUR

T1 - Interhemispheric transfer of post-amputation cortical plasticity within the human somatosensory cortex

AU - Valyear, Kenneth F

AU - Philip, Benjamin A

AU - Cirstea, Carmen M

AU - Chen, Pin-Wei

AU - Baune, Nathan

AU - Marchal, Noah

AU - Frey, Scott H

N1 - Copyright © 2019 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

PY - 2019/10/19

Y1 - 2019/10/19

N2 - Animal models reveal that deafferenting forelimb injuries precipitate reorganization in both contralateral and ipsilateral somatosensory cortices. The functional significance and duration of these effects are unknown, and it is unclear whether they also occur in injured humans. We delivered cutaneous stimulation during functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) to map the sensory cortical representation of the intact hand and lower face in a group of chronic, unilateral, upper extremity amputees (N = 19) and healthy matched controls (N = 29). Amputees exhibited greater activity than controls within the deafferented former sensory hand territory (S1f) during stimulation of the intact hand, but not of the lower face. Despite this cortical reorganization, amputees did not differ from controls in tactile acuity on their intact hands. S1f responses during hand stimulation were unrelated to tactile acuity, pain, prosthesis usage, or time since amputation. These effects appeared specific to the deafferented somatosensory modality, as fMRI visual mapping paradigm failed to detect any differences between groups. We conclude that S1f becomes responsive to cutaneous stimulation of the intact hand of amputees, and that this modality-specific reorganizational change persists for many years, if not indefinitely. The functional relevance of these changes, if any, remains unknown.

AB - Animal models reveal that deafferenting forelimb injuries precipitate reorganization in both contralateral and ipsilateral somatosensory cortices. The functional significance and duration of these effects are unknown, and it is unclear whether they also occur in injured humans. We delivered cutaneous stimulation during functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) to map the sensory cortical representation of the intact hand and lower face in a group of chronic, unilateral, upper extremity amputees (N = 19) and healthy matched controls (N = 29). Amputees exhibited greater activity than controls within the deafferented former sensory hand territory (S1f) during stimulation of the intact hand, but not of the lower face. Despite this cortical reorganization, amputees did not differ from controls in tactile acuity on their intact hands. S1f responses during hand stimulation were unrelated to tactile acuity, pain, prosthesis usage, or time since amputation. These effects appeared specific to the deafferented somatosensory modality, as fMRI visual mapping paradigm failed to detect any differences between groups. We conclude that S1f becomes responsive to cutaneous stimulation of the intact hand of amputees, and that this modality-specific reorganizational change persists for many years, if not indefinitely. The functional relevance of these changes, if any, remains unknown.

U2 - 10.1016/j.neuroimage.2019.116291

DO - 10.1016/j.neuroimage.2019.116291

M3 - Article

JO - Neuroimage

JF - Neuroimage

SN - 1053-8119

M1 - 116291

ER -