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150,000-year palaeoclimate record from northern Ethiopia supports early, multiple dispersals of modern humans from Africa. / Lamb, Henry; Bates, Richard; Bryant, Charlotte; Davies, Sarah; Huws, David; Marshall, Michael ; Roberts, Helen.

In: Scientific Reports, Vol. 8, 1077, 18.01.2018.

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Lamb, Henry ; Bates, Richard ; Bryant, Charlotte ; Davies, Sarah ; Huws, David ; Marshall, Michael ; Roberts, Helen. / 150,000-year palaeoclimate record from northern Ethiopia supports early, multiple dispersals of modern humans from Africa. In: Scientific Reports. 2018 ; Vol. 8.

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TY - JOUR

T1 - 150,000-year palaeoclimate record from northern Ethiopia supports early, multiple dispersals of modern humans from Africa

AU - Lamb, Henry

AU - Bates, Richard

AU - Bryant, Charlotte

AU - Davies, Sarah

AU - Huws, David

AU - Marshall, Michael

AU - Roberts, Helen

PY - 2018/1/18

Y1 - 2018/1/18

N2 - Climatic change is widely acknowledged to have played a role in the dispersal of modern humans out of Africa, but the timing is contentious. Genetic evidence links dispersal to climatic change ~60,000 years ago, despite increasing evidence for earlier modern human presence in Asia. We report a deep seismic and near-continuous core record of the last 150,000 years from Lake Tana, Ethiopia, close to early modern human fossil sites and to postulated dispersal routes. The record shows varied climate towards the end of the penultimate glacial, followed by an abrupt change to relatively stable moist climate during the last interglacial. These conditions could have favoured selection for behavioural versatility, population growth and range expansion, supporting models of early, multiple dispersals of modern humans from Africa.

AB - Climatic change is widely acknowledged to have played a role in the dispersal of modern humans out of Africa, but the timing is contentious. Genetic evidence links dispersal to climatic change ~60,000 years ago, despite increasing evidence for earlier modern human presence in Asia. We report a deep seismic and near-continuous core record of the last 150,000 years from Lake Tana, Ethiopia, close to early modern human fossil sites and to postulated dispersal routes. The record shows varied climate towards the end of the penultimate glacial, followed by an abrupt change to relatively stable moist climate during the last interglacial. These conditions could have favoured selection for behavioural versatility, population growth and range expansion, supporting models of early, multiple dispersals of modern humans from Africa.

U2 - 10.1038/s41598-018-19601-w

DO - 10.1038/s41598-018-19601-w

M3 - Article

VL - 8

JO - Scientific Reports

T2 - Scientific Reports

JF - Scientific Reports

SN - 2045-2322

M1 - 1077

ER -