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A nocturnal mammal, the greater mouse-eared bat, calibrates a magnetic compass by the sun. / Holland, Richard; Borissov, I.; Siemers, B.M.

In: Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the USA, Vol. 107, No. 15, 13.04.2010, p. 6941-6945.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

HarvardHarvard

Holland, R, Borissov, I & Siemers, BM 2010, 'A nocturnal mammal, the greater mouse-eared bat, calibrates a magnetic compass by the sun', Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the USA, vol. 107, no. 15, pp. 6941-6945. https://doi.org/10.1073/pnas.0912477107

APA

Holland, R., Borissov, I., & Siemers, B. M. (2010). A nocturnal mammal, the greater mouse-eared bat, calibrates a magnetic compass by the sun. Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the USA, 107(15), 6941-6945. https://doi.org/10.1073/pnas.0912477107

CBE

Holland R, Borissov I, Siemers BM. 2010. A nocturnal mammal, the greater mouse-eared bat, calibrates a magnetic compass by the sun. Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the USA. 107(15):6941-6945. https://doi.org/10.1073/pnas.0912477107

MLA

Holland, Richard, I. Borissov and B.M. Siemers. "A nocturnal mammal, the greater mouse-eared bat, calibrates a magnetic compass by the sun". Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the USA. 2010, 107(15). 6941-6945. https://doi.org/10.1073/pnas.0912477107

VancouverVancouver

Holland R, Borissov I, Siemers BM. A nocturnal mammal, the greater mouse-eared bat, calibrates a magnetic compass by the sun. Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the USA. 2010 Apr 13;107(15):6941-6945. https://doi.org/10.1073/pnas.0912477107

Author

Holland, Richard ; Borissov, I. ; Siemers, B.M. / A nocturnal mammal, the greater mouse-eared bat, calibrates a magnetic compass by the sun. In: Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the USA. 2010 ; Vol. 107, No. 15. pp. 6941-6945.

RIS

TY - JOUR

T1 - A nocturnal mammal, the greater mouse-eared bat, calibrates a magnetic compass by the sun

AU - Holland, Richard

AU - Borissov, I.

AU - Siemers, B.M.

PY - 2010/4/13

Y1 - 2010/4/13

N2 - Recent evidence suggests that bats can detect the geomagnetic field, but the way in which this is used by them for navigation to a home roost remains unresolved. The geomagnetic field may be used by animals both to indicate direction and to locate position. In birds, directional information appears to be derived from an interaction of the magnetic field with either the sun or the stars, with some evidence suggesting that sunset/sunrise provides the primary directional reference by which a magnetic compass is calibrated daily. We demonstrate that homing greater mouse-eared bats (Myotis myotis) calibrate a magnetic compass with sunset cues by testing their homing response after exposure to an altered magnetic field at and after sunset. Magnetic manipulation at sunset resulted in a counterclockwise shift in orientation compared with controls, consistent with sunset calibration of the magnetic field, whereas magnetic manipulation after sunset resulted in no change in orientation. Unlike in birds, however, the pattern of polarization was not necessary for the calibration. For animals that occupy ecological niches where the sunset is rarely observed, this is a surprising finding. Yet it may indicate the primacy of the sun as an absolute geographical reference not only for birds but also within other vertebrate taxa.

AB - Recent evidence suggests that bats can detect the geomagnetic field, but the way in which this is used by them for navigation to a home roost remains unresolved. The geomagnetic field may be used by animals both to indicate direction and to locate position. In birds, directional information appears to be derived from an interaction of the magnetic field with either the sun or the stars, with some evidence suggesting that sunset/sunrise provides the primary directional reference by which a magnetic compass is calibrated daily. We demonstrate that homing greater mouse-eared bats (Myotis myotis) calibrate a magnetic compass with sunset cues by testing their homing response after exposure to an altered magnetic field at and after sunset. Magnetic manipulation at sunset resulted in a counterclockwise shift in orientation compared with controls, consistent with sunset calibration of the magnetic field, whereas magnetic manipulation after sunset resulted in no change in orientation. Unlike in birds, however, the pattern of polarization was not necessary for the calibration. For animals that occupy ecological niches where the sunset is rarely observed, this is a surprising finding. Yet it may indicate the primacy of the sun as an absolute geographical reference not only for birds but also within other vertebrate taxa.

U2 - 10.1073/pnas.0912477107

DO - 10.1073/pnas.0912477107

M3 - Article

VL - 107

SP - 6941

EP - 6945

JO - Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the USA

JF - Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the USA

SN - 0027-8424

IS - 15

ER -