Human alteration of natural light cycles: causes and ecological consequences

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  • KJ Gaston
  • JP Duffy
  • S Gaston
  • J Bennie
  • TW Davies
    University of Exeter
© 2014, The Author(s). Artificial light at night is profoundly altering natural light cycles, particularly as perceived by many organisms, over extensive areas of the globe. This alteration comprises the introduction of light at night at places and times at which it has not previously occurred, and with different spectral signatures. Given the long geological periods for which light cycles have previously been consistent, this constitutes a novel environmental pressure, and one for which there is evidence for biological effects that span from molecular to community level. Here we provide a synthesis of understanding of the form and extent of this alteration, some of the key consequences for terrestrial and aquatic ecosystems, interactions and synergies with other anthropogenic pressures on the environment, major uncertainties, and future prospects and management options. This constitutes a compelling example of the need for a thoroughly interdisciplinary approach to understanding and managing the impact of one particular anthropogenic pressure. The former requires insights that span molecular biology to ecosystem ecology, and the latter contributions of biologists, policy makers and engineers.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)917-931
Number of pages15
JournalOecologia
Volume176
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 1 Jan 2014
Externally publishedYes
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