Standard Standard

Impacts of Bottom Fishing on Sediment Biogeochemical and Biological Parameters in Cohesive and Non-cohesive Sediments. / Sciberras, Marija; Parker, Ruth; Powell, Claire; Robertson, Craig; Kroger, Silke; Bolam, Stefan; Hiddink, Jan.

In: Limnology and Oceanography, Vol. 61, No. 6, 11.2016, p. 2076-2089.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

HarvardHarvard

Sciberras, M, Parker, R, Powell, C, Robertson, C, Kroger, S, Bolam, S & Hiddink, J 2016, 'Impacts of Bottom Fishing on Sediment Biogeochemical and Biological Parameters in Cohesive and Non-cohesive Sediments', Limnology and Oceanography, vol. 61, no. 6, pp. 2076-2089. https://doi.org/10.1002/lno.10354

APA

CBE

MLA

VancouverVancouver

Sciberras M, Parker R, Powell C, Robertson C, Kroger S, Bolam S et al. Impacts of Bottom Fishing on Sediment Biogeochemical and Biological Parameters in Cohesive and Non-cohesive Sediments. Limnology and Oceanography. 2016 Nov;61(6):2076-2089. https://doi.org/10.1002/lno.10354

Author

Sciberras, Marija ; Parker, Ruth ; Powell, Claire ; Robertson, Craig ; Kroger, Silke ; Bolam, Stefan ; Hiddink, Jan. / Impacts of Bottom Fishing on Sediment Biogeochemical and Biological Parameters in Cohesive and Non-cohesive Sediments. In: Limnology and Oceanography. 2016 ; Vol. 61, No. 6. pp. 2076-2089.

RIS

TY - JOUR

T1 - Impacts of Bottom Fishing on Sediment Biogeochemical and Biological Parameters in Cohesive and Non-cohesive Sediments

AU - Sciberras, Marija

AU - Parker, Ruth

AU - Powell, Claire

AU - Robertson, Craig

AU - Kroger, Silke

AU - Bolam, Stefan

AU - Hiddink, Jan

PY - 2016/11

Y1 - 2016/11

N2 - Sediment resuspension and bed reworking by tides, waves and biological activity are frequent in the energetic coastal environments. Sediment mixing by tides and waves are generally more important in regulating sediment processes in advection-dominated system such as sandy sediments, whereas sediment reworking by bioturbation is more important in diffusion-dominated systems such as muddy sediments. Bottom fishing constitutes an additional significant impact on benthic communities and sediment biogeochemical processes in coastal areas through physical changes in sediment resuspension and mixing and changes to bioturbating fauna. This study examined the biological (macro-infaunal) and biogeochemical responses to fishing at a muddy and sandy site in the Irish Sea that were predominantly impacted by otter trawls and scallop dredges, respectively. The sandy habitat (>90% sand) was typical of a hydrodynamic environment characterized by a diverse array of small infaunal species, low organic carbon levels and fast remineralisation of organic matter in the sediment. The muddier habitat (>65% fines) was dominated by fewer but larger bioturbating species compared to sand, and illustrated highly diffusional solute transport, higher organic carbon content and a shallower oxygen penetration depth. Generally there appeared to be no clear statistically significant changes in the biogeochemistry of the sandy or muddy habitat that could be attributed to different intensities of fishing. However, pore-water nutrient profiles of ammonium, phosphate and silicate provided clear evidence of organic matter burial and/or mixing as a result of trawling at the muddy site. The biogeochemistry at the sandy site appeared to remain dominated by the natural physical environment, so impact of fishing disturbance was less evident. These results suggest that fishing does not have comparable effects on the biology and biogeochemical processes in all benthic habitats.

AB - Sediment resuspension and bed reworking by tides, waves and biological activity are frequent in the energetic coastal environments. Sediment mixing by tides and waves are generally more important in regulating sediment processes in advection-dominated system such as sandy sediments, whereas sediment reworking by bioturbation is more important in diffusion-dominated systems such as muddy sediments. Bottom fishing constitutes an additional significant impact on benthic communities and sediment biogeochemical processes in coastal areas through physical changes in sediment resuspension and mixing and changes to bioturbating fauna. This study examined the biological (macro-infaunal) and biogeochemical responses to fishing at a muddy and sandy site in the Irish Sea that were predominantly impacted by otter trawls and scallop dredges, respectively. The sandy habitat (>90% sand) was typical of a hydrodynamic environment characterized by a diverse array of small infaunal species, low organic carbon levels and fast remineralisation of organic matter in the sediment. The muddier habitat (>65% fines) was dominated by fewer but larger bioturbating species compared to sand, and illustrated highly diffusional solute transport, higher organic carbon content and a shallower oxygen penetration depth. Generally there appeared to be no clear statistically significant changes in the biogeochemistry of the sandy or muddy habitat that could be attributed to different intensities of fishing. However, pore-water nutrient profiles of ammonium, phosphate and silicate provided clear evidence of organic matter burial and/or mixing as a result of trawling at the muddy site. The biogeochemistry at the sandy site appeared to remain dominated by the natural physical environment, so impact of fishing disturbance was less evident. These results suggest that fishing does not have comparable effects on the biology and biogeochemical processes in all benthic habitats.

U2 - 10.1002/lno.10354

DO - 10.1002/lno.10354

M3 - Article

VL - 61

SP - 2076

EP - 2089

JO - Limnology and Oceanography

JF - Limnology and Oceanography

SN - 0024-3590

IS - 6

ER -