Standard Standard

Single-subject analyses of magnetoencephalographic evoked responses to the acoustic properties of affective non-verbal vocalizations. / Salvia, E.; Bestelmeyer, P.E.; Kotz, S.A.; Rousselet, G.A.; Pernet, C.R.; Gross, J.; Belin, P.

In: Frontiers in Neuroscience, Vol. 8, 22.12.2014.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

HarvardHarvard

APA

CBE

MLA

VancouverVancouver

Author

Salvia, E. ; Bestelmeyer, P.E. ; Kotz, S.A. ; Rousselet, G.A. ; Pernet, C.R. ; Gross, J. ; Belin, P. / Single-subject analyses of magnetoencephalographic evoked responses to the acoustic properties of affective non-verbal vocalizations. In: Frontiers in Neuroscience. 2014 ; Vol. 8.

RIS

TY - JOUR

T1 - Single-subject analyses of magnetoencephalographic evoked responses to the acoustic properties of affective non-verbal vocalizations.

AU - Salvia, E.

AU - Bestelmeyer, P.E.

AU - Kotz, S.A.

AU - Rousselet, G.A.

AU - Pernet, C.R.

AU - Gross, J.

AU - Belin, P.

N1 - This Document is Protected by copyright and was first published by Frontiers. All rights reserved. it is reproduced with permission

PY - 2014/12/22

Y1 - 2014/12/22

N2 - Magneto-encephalography (MEG) was used to examine the cerebral response to affective non-verbal vocalizations (ANVs) at the single-subject level. Stimuli consisted of non-verbal affect bursts from the Montreal Affective Voices morphed to parametrically vary acoustical structure and perceived emotional properties. Scalp magnetic fields were recorded in three participants while they performed a 3-alternative forced choice emotion categorization task (Anger, Fear, Pleasure). Each participant performed more than 6000 trials to allow single-subject level statistical analyses using a new toolbox which implements the general linear model (GLM) on stimulus-specific responses (LIMO-EEG). For each participant we estimated “simple” models [including just one affective regressor (Arousal or Valence)] as well as “combined” models (including acoustical regressors). Results from the “simple” models revealed in every participant the significant early effects (as early as ~100 ms after onset) of Valence and Arousal already reported at the group-level in previous work. However, the “combined” models showed that few effects of Arousal remained after removing the acoustically-explained variance, whereas significant effects of Valence remained especially at late stages. This study demonstrates (i) that single-subject analyses replicate the results observed at early stages by group-level studies and (ii) the feasibility of GLM-based analysis of MEG data. It also suggests that early modulation of MEG amplitude by affective stimuli partly reflects their acoustical properties.

AB - Magneto-encephalography (MEG) was used to examine the cerebral response to affective non-verbal vocalizations (ANVs) at the single-subject level. Stimuli consisted of non-verbal affect bursts from the Montreal Affective Voices morphed to parametrically vary acoustical structure and perceived emotional properties. Scalp magnetic fields were recorded in three participants while they performed a 3-alternative forced choice emotion categorization task (Anger, Fear, Pleasure). Each participant performed more than 6000 trials to allow single-subject level statistical analyses using a new toolbox which implements the general linear model (GLM) on stimulus-specific responses (LIMO-EEG). For each participant we estimated “simple” models [including just one affective regressor (Arousal or Valence)] as well as “combined” models (including acoustical regressors). Results from the “simple” models revealed in every participant the significant early effects (as early as ~100 ms after onset) of Valence and Arousal already reported at the group-level in previous work. However, the “combined” models showed that few effects of Arousal remained after removing the acoustically-explained variance, whereas significant effects of Valence remained especially at late stages. This study demonstrates (i) that single-subject analyses replicate the results observed at early stages by group-level studies and (ii) the feasibility of GLM-based analysis of MEG data. It also suggests that early modulation of MEG amplitude by affective stimuli partly reflects their acoustical properties.

U2 - 10.3389/fnins.2014.00422

DO - 10.3389/fnins.2014.00422

M3 - Article

VL - 8

JO - Frontiers in Neuroscience

JF - Frontiers in Neuroscience

SN - 1662-453X

ER -