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The moderating role of narcissism on the reciprocal relationship between self-efficacy and performance. / Beattie, Stuart; Dempsey, Chelsey; Roberts, Ross; Woodman, Tim; Cooke, Andrew.

Yn: Sport, Exercise, and Performance Psychology, Cyfrol 6, Rhif 2, 05.2017, t. 199-214.

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Beattie, Stuart ; Dempsey, Chelsey ; Roberts, Ross ; Woodman, Tim ; Cooke, Andrew. / The moderating role of narcissism on the reciprocal relationship between self-efficacy and performance. Yn: Sport, Exercise, and Performance Psychology. 2017 ; Cyfrol 6, Rhif 2. tt. 199-214.

RIS

TY - JOUR

T1 - The moderating role of narcissism on the reciprocal relationship between self-efficacy and performance

AU - Beattie, Stuart

AU - Dempsey, Chelsey

AU - Roberts, Ross

AU - Woodman, Tim

AU - Cooke, Andrew

N1 - This article may not exactly replicate the final version published in the APA journal. It is not the copy of record

PY - 2017/5

Y1 - 2017/5

N2 - We examined the moderating role of narcissism – a personality variable associated with overconfidence – on the reciprocal relationship between self-efficacy and performance. Participants (N = 87) completed ten experimental trials on a driving simulator and we recorded participants’ performance and self-efficacy beliefs across trials. Hierarchical linear modelling demonstrated that performance had a positive relationship with self-efficacy (supporting the majority of self-efficacy research). However, narcissism moderated this relationship. Specifically, when narcissism was high, performance had no relationship with subsequent self-efficacy. Conversely, self-efficacy had a significant negative relationship with performance and narcissism did not moderate this relationship. A secondary purpose of the study was to examine the role of narcissism in the relationship between self-efficacy and effort, and between effort and performance. Narcissism significantly moderated the relationship between self-efficacy and self-reported effort, and between self-reported effort and performance.

AB - We examined the moderating role of narcissism – a personality variable associated with overconfidence – on the reciprocal relationship between self-efficacy and performance. Participants (N = 87) completed ten experimental trials on a driving simulator and we recorded participants’ performance and self-efficacy beliefs across trials. Hierarchical linear modelling demonstrated that performance had a positive relationship with self-efficacy (supporting the majority of self-efficacy research). However, narcissism moderated this relationship. Specifically, when narcissism was high, performance had no relationship with subsequent self-efficacy. Conversely, self-efficacy had a significant negative relationship with performance and narcissism did not moderate this relationship. A secondary purpose of the study was to examine the role of narcissism in the relationship between self-efficacy and effort, and between effort and performance. Narcissism significantly moderated the relationship between self-efficacy and self-reported effort, and between self-reported effort and performance.

KW - Self-efficacy, performance, narcissism, effort, positive, negative

U2 - 10.1037/spy0000092

DO - 10.1037/spy0000092

M3 - Article

VL - 6

SP - 199

EP - 214

JO - Sport, Exercise, and Performance Psychology

JF - Sport, Exercise, and Performance Psychology

SN - 2157-3905

IS - 2

ER -