Fersiynau electronig

Dogfennau

  • Brlik et al_2019_accepted_manuscript

    Llawysgrif awdur wedi’i dderbyn, 1 MB, dogfen-PDF

    Embargo yn dod i ben: 16/02/20

    Trwydded: !!Other

Dangosydd eitem ddigidol (DOI)

  • Vojtěch Brlík
    Institute of Vertebrate Biology, The Czech Academy of SciencesDepartment of Ecology, Faculty of Science, Charles University in Prague
  • Jaroslav Koleček
    Institute of Vertebrate Biology, The Czech Academy of Sciences
  • Malcolm Burgess
    RSPB
  • Steffen Hahn
    Swiss Ornithological Institute
  • Diana Humple
    Point Blue Conservation Science
  • Miloš Krist
    Department of Zoology, Faculty of Science, Palacký University
  • Janne Ouwehand
    Conservation Ecology Group, Groningen Institute for Evolutionary Life Sciences, University of Groningen
  • Emily Weiser
    Division of Biology, Kansas State UniversityU.S. Geological Survey
  • Peter Adamík
    Department of Zoology, Faculty of Science, Palacký UniversityMuseum of Natural History, Olomouc
  • José Alves
    Department of Biology & Centre for Environmental and Marine Studies, University of AveiroUniversity of Iceland
  • Debora Arlt
    Department of Ecology, Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences
  • Sanja Barišić
    Institute of Ornithology, Croatian Academy of Sciences and Arts
  • Detlef Becker
    Museum Heineanum
  • Eduardo Belda
    Universitat Politècnica de València
  • Václav Beran
    Department of Zoology, Faculty of Science, Palacký UniversityMunicipal Museum of Ústí nad LabemALKA Wildlife o.p.s.
  • Christiaan Both
    Conservation Ecology Group, Groningen Institute for Evolutionary Life Sciences, University of Groningen
  • Susana Bravo
    CIEMEP, CONICET/UNPSJB
  • Martins Briedis
    Swiss Ornithological Institute
  • Bohumír Chutný
  • Davor Ćiković
    Institute of Ornithology, Croatian Academy of Sciences and Arts
  • Nathan Cooper
    Migratory Bird Center, Smithsonian Conservation Biology Institute
  • Joana Costa
    Department of Biology & Centre for Environmental and Marine Studies, University of Aveiro
  • Víctor Cueto
    CIEMEP, CONICET/UNPSJB
  • Tamara Emmenegger
    Swiss Ornithological Institute
  • Kevin Fraser
    University of Manitoba, Winnipeg
  • Olivier Gilg
    Université de Bourgogne Franche-ComtéGroupe de recherche en Ecologie Arctique
  • Marina Guerrero
    Servicio de Jardines, Bosques y Huertas, Patronato de la Alhambra y el Generalife
  • Michael Hallworth
    Migratory Bird Center, Smithsonian Conservation Biology Institute
  • Chris Hewson
    British Trust for Ornithology
  • James Johnson
    U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service
  • Frédéric Jiguet
    MNHN-CNRS-Sorbonne Université
  • Tosha Kelly
    Advanced Facility for Avian Research, The University of Western Ontario
  • Dmitry Kishkinev
  • Michel Leconte
  • Terje Lislevand
    University Museum of Bergen, Department of Natural History, University of Bergen
  • Simeon Lisovski
    Swiss Ornithological Institute
  • Cosme López
    Department of Zoology, Faculty of Biology, The University of Sevilla
  • Kent McFarland
    Vermont Center for Ecostudies
  • Peter Marra
    Migratory Bird Center, Smithsonian Conservation Biology Institute
  • Steven Matsuoka
    U.S. Fish and Wildlife ServiceUSGS Alaska Science Center
  • Piotr Matyjasiak
    Department of Evolutionary Biology, Faculty of Biology and Environmental Sciences, Cardinal Stefan Wyszyński University in Warsaw
  • Christoph Meier
    Swiss Ornithological Institute
  • Benjamin Metzger
  • Juan Monrós
    Cavanilles Institute of Biodiversity and Evolutionary Biology, University of Valencia
  • Roland Neumann
  • Amy Newman
    University of Guelph, Ontario
  • Ryan Norris
    University of Guelph, Ontario
  • Tomas Pärt
    Department of Ecology, Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences
  • Václav Pavel
    Department of Zoology, Faculty of Science, Palacký UniversityCentre for Polar Ecology, University of South Bohemia
  • Noah Perlut
    Department of Environmental Studies, University of New England
  • Markus Piha
    Finnish Museum of Natural History LUOMUS, University of Helsinki
  • Jeroen Reneerkens
    Conservation Ecology Group, Groningen Institute for Evolutionary Life Sciences, University of Groningen
  • Christopher Rimmer
    Vermont Center for Ecostudies
  • Amélie Roberto-Charron
    Avian Behaviour and Conservation Lab, Department of Biological Sciences, University of Manitoba
  • Chiara Scandolara
    Swiss Ornithological Institute
  • Natasha Sokolova
    Arctic Research Station of Institute of Plant and Animal Ecology, Russian Academy of Sciences (Ural Branch)Arctic Research Center of Yamal-Nenets Autonomous District
  • Makiko Takenaka
    Tokai University Sapporo Campus
  • Dirk Tolkmitt
  • Herman van Oosten
    Oenanthe EcologieInstitute for Water and Wetland Research, Animal Ecology, Physiology & Experimental Plant Ecology, Radboud University
  • Arndt Wellbrock
    Institute of Biology, Department of Chemistry – Biology, Faculty of Science and Technology, University of Siegen
  • Hazel Wheeler
    Wildlife Preservation Canada
  • Jan van der Winden
    Ecology Research & Consultancy
  • Klaudia Witte
    Institute of Biology, Department of Chemistry – Biology, Faculty of Science and Technology, University of Siegen
  • Brad Woodworth
    School of Biological Sciences, The University of Queensland
  • Petr Procházka
    Institute of Vertebrate Biology, The Czech Academy of Sciences
1. Currently, the deployment of tracking devices is one of the most frequently used approaches to study movement ecology of birds. Recent miniaturisation of light-level geolocators enabled studying small bird species whose migratory patterns were widely unknown. However, geolocators may reduce vital rates in tagged birds and may bias obtained movement data. 2. There is a need for a thorough assessment of the potential tag effects on small birds, as previous meta-analyses did not evaluate unpublished data and impact of multiple life-history traits, focused mainly on large species and the number of published studies tagging small birds has increased substantially. 3. We quantitatively reviewed 549 records extracted from 74 published and 48 unpublished studies on over 7,800 tagged and 17,800 control individuals to examine the effects of geolocator tagging on small bird species (body mass <100 g). We calculated the effect of tagging on apparent survival, condition, phenology and breeding performance and identified the most important predictors of the magnitude of effect sizes. 4. Even though the effects were not statistically significant in phylogenetically controlled models, we found a weak negative impact of geolocators on apparent survival. The negative effect on apparent survival was stronger with increasing relative load of the device and with geolocators attached using elastic harnesses. Moreover, tagging effects were stronger in smaller species. 5. In conclusion, we found a weak effect on apparent survival of tagged birds and managed to pinpoint key aspects and drivers of tagging effects. We provide recommendations for establishing matched control group for proper effect size assessment in future studies and outline various aspects of tagging that need further investigation. Finally, our results encourage further use of geolocators on small bird species but the ethical aspects and scientific benefits should always be considered.

Allweddeiriau

Iaith wreiddiolSaesneg
CyfnodolynJournal of Animal Ecology
CyfrolSpecial Issue on Biologging (May 2019)
Dyddiad ar-lein cynnar16 Chwef 2019
Dynodwyr Gwrthrych Digidol (DOIs)
StatwsCyhoeddwyd - 19 Maw 2019
Gweld graff cysylltiadau