Dr John Mulley

Senior Lecturer in Zoology (Molecular Ecology)

Contact info

Location: Room E1, 4th floor Brambell Building

Telephone: +44 (0)1248 383492

Personal webpage: www.johnmulley.com

Twitter: @JohnMulley

Contact Info

Location: Room E1, 4th floor Brambell Building

Telephone: +44 (0)1248 383492

Personal webpage: www.johnmulley.com

Twitter: @JohnMulley

Overview

Evo-Devo@Bangor

My main research interest is in the way that genomic changes have influenced animal evolution and development. Current research projects focus on the GC-biased mutation in desert rodents, snake venom evolution, and the mechanisms by which the uterine environment can change gene expression in the embryo.

Postgraduate Project Opportunities

Comparative genomics

I have a long-standing interest in vertebrate genome evolution, especially as it relates to gene and genome duplication, and/or the evolution of novelty. Whole genome duplications look likely to have played a significant role in the evolution of vertebrates, and particularly the development of vertebrate innovations, and gene duplication has been an important factor in the origin and diversification of snake venom.

Postgraduate opportunities in this area relate to the evolution of vertebrate homeobox genes; GC-biased mutation in desert rodents; and snake venom evolution, taking advantage of recent advances in long-read sequencing and techniques for the assembly of chromosome-scale genome assemblies such as Hi-C.

Postgraduate Project Opportunities

Evolution and Development (Evo-Devo)

Changes to embryonic development can have major effects on adult morphology, and the evolution of developmental processes has been a major driver of animal evolution.

Postgraduate opportunities in this area relate to my current research into vertebrate axial patterning, and particularly how the uterine environment might influence numbers and types of vertebrae in mouse models. These projects would require management of rodent breeding programs; collection of embryos; antibody-based hormones assays, and gene/protein expression studies. There is scope for expansion of this research into studies of human and non-human primate vertebral variation.  

 

Postgraduate Project Opportunities

Snake venom evolution

The availability of whole genome sequences for multiple snake species is providing unprecedented insight into the processes underlying the origin and diversification of snake venom. Bangor University is one of the few Universities in the UK that maintains a collection of venomous snakes, and this invaluable resource facilitates research into the genetic factors responsible for inter- and intra-species variation in snake venom composition.

Postgraduate opportunities in this area relate to the determination of the gene and genome level mechanisms that drive variation in venom composition within and between species.

Research areas and keywords

Keywords

  • QL Zoology
  • QH301 Biology
  • QH426 Genetics

Education / academic qualifications

  • 2007 - DPhil , The Evolution of Vertebrate ParaHox Genes
  • 2003 - MSc , Biosystematics
  • 2002 - BSc , Genetics

Research outputs (25)

View all

View graph of relations