It's Good But it's Not Right: Instructional Self-Talk and Skilled Performance

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It's Good But it's Not Right: Instructional Self-Talk and Skilled Performance. / Hardy, J.T.; Hardy, J.; Begley, K.; Blanchfield, A.W.

In: Journal of Applied Sport Psychology, 04.09.2014.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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Hardy, J.T. ; Hardy, J. ; Begley, K. ; Blanchfield, A.W. / It's Good But it's Not Right: Instructional Self-Talk and Skilled Performance. In: Journal of Applied Sport Psychology. 2014.

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TY - JOUR

T1 - It's Good But it's Not Right: Instructional Self-Talk and Skilled Performance

AU - Hardy, J.T.

AU - Hardy, J.

AU - Begley, K.

AU - Blanchfield, A.W.

N1 - This is an Accepted Manuscript of an article published by Taylor & Francis in Journal of Applied Sport Psychology on 04/09/2014, available online: http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/10413200.2014.959624

PY - 2014/9/4

Y1 - 2014/9/4

N2 - This research examined the relative effectiveness of instructional versus motivational self-talk for skilled athletes. Forty Gaelic footballers completed a shooting accuracy task with their dominant and non-dominant feet. Results indicated significantly more accurate performance when executing the task using the dominant foot and motivational as compared to instructional self-talk. No difference emerged between the two types of self-talk within the non-dominant foot condition. Results challenge the widely held view that instructional self-talk is most effective for accuracy based tasks and should prompt practitioners to consider the skill level of their clients when constructing self-talk interventions.

AB - This research examined the relative effectiveness of instructional versus motivational self-talk for skilled athletes. Forty Gaelic footballers completed a shooting accuracy task with their dominant and non-dominant feet. Results indicated significantly more accurate performance when executing the task using the dominant foot and motivational as compared to instructional self-talk. No difference emerged between the two types of self-talk within the non-dominant foot condition. Results challenge the widely held view that instructional self-talk is most effective for accuracy based tasks and should prompt practitioners to consider the skill level of their clients when constructing self-talk interventions.

U2 - 10.1080/10413200.2014.959624

DO - 10.1080/10413200.2014.959624

M3 - Article

JO - Journal of Applied Sport Psychology

JF - Journal of Applied Sport Psychology

SN - 1041-3200

ER -