Standard Standard

Segmentäre Gesellschaften oder Feudalstaaten? Das irische Frühmittelalter und die Interpretation des archäologischen Befundes. / Karl, R.; Burmeister, S. (Editor); Muller-Scheessel, N. (Editor).

Soziale Gruppen – Kulturelle Grenzen. Die Interpretation Sizialer Identitäten in der Prähistorischen Archäologie.. 2006. ed. Tübinger Archäologische Taschenbücher 5 (Münster: Waxmann Verlag), 2006. p. 233-256.

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingChapter

HarvardHarvard

Karl, R, Burmeister, S (ed.) & Muller-Scheessel, N (ed.) 2006, Segmentäre Gesellschaften oder Feudalstaaten? Das irische Frühmittelalter und die Interpretation des archäologischen Befundes. in Soziale Gruppen – Kulturelle Grenzen. Die Interpretation Sizialer Identitäten in der Prähistorischen Archäologie.. 2006 edn, Tübinger Archäologische Taschenbücher 5 (Münster: Waxmann Verlag), pp. 233-256.

APA

Karl, R., Burmeister, S. (Ed.), & Muller-Scheessel, N. (Ed.) (2006). Segmentäre Gesellschaften oder Feudalstaaten? Das irische Frühmittelalter und die Interpretation des archäologischen Befundes. In Soziale Gruppen – Kulturelle Grenzen. Die Interpretation Sizialer Identitäten in der Prähistorischen Archäologie. (2006 ed., pp. 233-256). Tübinger Archäologische Taschenbücher 5 (Münster: Waxmann Verlag).

CBE

Karl R, Burmeister S, Muller-Scheessel N, ed. 2006. Segmentäre Gesellschaften oder Feudalstaaten? Das irische Frühmittelalter und die Interpretation des archäologischen Befundes. In Soziale Gruppen – Kulturelle Grenzen. Die Interpretation Sizialer Identitäten in der Prähistorischen Archäologie.. 2006 ed. Tübinger Archäologische Taschenbücher 5 (Münster: Waxmann Verlag). pp. 233-256.

MLA

Karl, R., S. Burmeister and N. Muller-Scheessel, ed. "Segmentäre Gesellschaften oder Feudalstaaten? Das irische Frühmittelalter und die Interpretation des archäologischen Befundes.". Soziale Gruppen – Kulturelle Grenzen. Die Interpretation Sizialer Identitäten in der Prähistorischen Archäologie.. 2006 udg., Tübinger Archäologische Taschenbücher 5 (Münster: Waxmann Verlag). 2006, 233-256.

VancouverVancouver

Karl R, Burmeister S, (ed.), Muller-Scheessel N, (ed.). Segmentäre Gesellschaften oder Feudalstaaten? Das irische Frühmittelalter und die Interpretation des archäologischen Befundes. In Soziale Gruppen – Kulturelle Grenzen. Die Interpretation Sizialer Identitäten in der Prähistorischen Archäologie.. 2006 ed. Tübinger Archäologische Taschenbücher 5 (Münster: Waxmann Verlag). 2006. p. 233-256

Author

Karl, R. ; Burmeister, S. (Editor) ; Muller-Scheessel, N. (Editor). / Segmentäre Gesellschaften oder Feudalstaaten? Das irische Frühmittelalter und die Interpretation des archäologischen Befundes. Soziale Gruppen – Kulturelle Grenzen. Die Interpretation Sizialer Identitäten in der Prähistorischen Archäologie.. 2006. ed. Tübinger Archäologische Taschenbücher 5 (Münster: Waxmann Verlag), 2006. pp. 233-256

RIS

TY - CHAP

T1 - Segmentäre Gesellschaften oder Feudalstaaten? Das irische Frühmittelalter und die Interpretation des archäologischen Befundes.

AU - Karl, R.

A2 - Burmeister, S.

A2 - Muller-Scheessel, N.

PY - 2006/1/1

Y1 - 2006/1/1

N2 - Title translation: ‘Segmentary Societies or Feudal States? Early Medieval Ireland and the Interpretation of the Archaeological Record' Using early medieval Ireland as a case study, the chapter examines to what degree social complexity can be identified in the archaeological record. The early medieval period in Ireland is well attested in both historical and archaeological sources. Historical and archaeological sources are analysed separately, to demonstrate the different degrees of social complexity that can be observed in them. The first part of the analysis assesses whether ethnic groups – a currently popular classificatory tool for prehistoric societies in archaeology – can be identified in the Irish archaeological record. It is examined whether it is possible to relate the archaeological evidence to the multi-layered concepts of ethnic and quasi-ethnic identity as can be found in the medieval historical sources. The second part of the analysis assesses whether the high degree of social complexity, demonstrated in the historical sources by well-defined status and professional social classes, is also observable in the archaeological record. It is demonstrated that in both areas examined, the social complexity observable in the archaeological record is far lower than that observable in the historical record. While the archaeology of early medieval Ireland seems to show quite simple, segmentary societies, the historical sources present us with highly complex stratified societies. It is concluded that archaeological methods to analyse social complexity can only demonstrate a terminus super quem, the lowest possible degree of social complexity in the assessed societies.

AB - Title translation: ‘Segmentary Societies or Feudal States? Early Medieval Ireland and the Interpretation of the Archaeological Record' Using early medieval Ireland as a case study, the chapter examines to what degree social complexity can be identified in the archaeological record. The early medieval period in Ireland is well attested in both historical and archaeological sources. Historical and archaeological sources are analysed separately, to demonstrate the different degrees of social complexity that can be observed in them. The first part of the analysis assesses whether ethnic groups – a currently popular classificatory tool for prehistoric societies in archaeology – can be identified in the Irish archaeological record. It is examined whether it is possible to relate the archaeological evidence to the multi-layered concepts of ethnic and quasi-ethnic identity as can be found in the medieval historical sources. The second part of the analysis assesses whether the high degree of social complexity, demonstrated in the historical sources by well-defined status and professional social classes, is also observable in the archaeological record. It is demonstrated that in both areas examined, the social complexity observable in the archaeological record is far lower than that observable in the historical record. While the archaeology of early medieval Ireland seems to show quite simple, segmentary societies, the historical sources present us with highly complex stratified societies. It is concluded that archaeological methods to analyse social complexity can only demonstrate a terminus super quem, the lowest possible degree of social complexity in the assessed societies.

M3 - Chapter

SN - 3830916515

SP - 233

EP - 256

BT - Soziale Gruppen – Kulturelle Grenzen. Die Interpretation Sizialer Identitäten in der Prähistorischen Archäologie.

PB - Tübinger Archäologische Taschenbücher 5 (Münster: Waxmann Verlag)

ER -