Who commits ‘heritage crimes’? Archaeology, the law, and civil rights in Austria

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Description

Archaeologists frequently accuse others (that is, non-professionals) of committing ‘heritage crimes’. But is it a ‘heritage crime’ if no law is broken? Is it not a ‘heritage crime’ if a heritage law is broken by professional archaeologists? And would it be a ‘heritage crime’ if, say, a heritage agency were to excessively apply a heritage legislation to prevent entirely legal activities, and thus unconstitutionally restrict fundamental civil liberties? This paper examines who actually commits ‘heritage crimes’ in Austria; and whether it is truly those who archaeologists normally suspect, or whether the worst serial offenders are to be found much closer to home.
3 Sep 2016

Event (Conference)

Title22nd Annual Meeting of the European Association of Archaeologists
Period31/08/164/09/16
Web address (URL)
LocationUniversity of Vilnius
CityVilnius
CountryLithuania
Degree of recognitionInternational event

Event (Conference)

Title22nd Annual Meeting of the European Association of Archaeologists
Date31/08/164/09/16
Website
LocationUniversity of Vilnius
CityVilnius
CountryLithuania
Degree of recognitionInternational event

Keywords

  • Archaeology, Heritage management, Heritage law, Austria, Civil Rights

Prof. activities and awards (2)

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