Dr Laura Grange

Lecturer in Marine Biology

Contact info

Room: 213 Marine Centre Wales     Phone: +44 (0)1248 382816

Email: l.grange@bangor.ac.uk

Web: ResearchGate

I graduated in Oceanography with Marine Biology from the University of Southampton in 2001. I remained at the University of Southampton for a further three years undertaking a PhD in the reproductive success of Antarctic marine invertebrates from which I graduated in 2005. Following my PhD, I worked as a Marine Environmental Consultant at the Centre for Marine and Coastal Studies (CMACS Ltd) in Birkenhead, Liverpool. Here, I was tasked with undertaking inshore and offshore surveys, laboratory analyses and report writing to inform environmental impact assessments for a diversity of coastal and offshore developments. In 2009 I moved to the Department of Oceanography (Marine Sciences) at the University of Hawai'i at Manoa to undertake a postdoctoral scholarship, where I worked on two projects focussed on the impacts of climate change on ecological processes in Antarctic seafloor ecosystems. Among other things, these projects involved exploring the link between pelagic and benthic systems under changing environmental conditions, and investigating the evolution of seafloor communities in response to changes in ice cover. During this time, I was appointed to a part-time Assistant Professor position and tasked with developing the first Marine Biology graduate programme in Hawai'i. In 2013 I was appointed a Teaching Fellow in Marine Biology in the School of Ocean and Earth Science at the University of Southampton, where I delivered a wide range of undergraduate and postgraduate teaching. Following on from this appointment, I was promoted to Lecturer in Marine Biology and continued to engage in a variety of teaching and scholarship activities across the University. In 2018 I was appointed Lecturer in Marine Biology at Bangor University and moved to the School of Ocean Sciences in Menai Bridge.

I am a benthic marine ecologist, with a specialism in the Polar Regions. My primary research interests focus on using benthic systems as models to investigate marine ecological and biological theory against a backdrop of changing environmental conditions, and evaluating benthic ecosystem responses to climate change. Particular areas of interest include the population consequences of ocean warming on the seasonal and inter-annual reproductive ecology of Antarctic marine invertebrates, and the reproductive resilience of Arctic marine invertebrates to environmental variability associated with changing sea ice conditions (The Changing Arctic Ocean Seafloor (ChAOS)). In addition, I am actively engaged in research that aims to enhance assessment feedback practice in Higher Education. Among other things, this engagement includes my involvement in two HEFCE-funded research initiatives (HEFCE Catalyst A and B) aimed at supporting student agency and success in higher education and beyond. 

Contact Info

Room: 213 Marine Centre Wales     Phone: +44 (0)1248 382816

Email: l.grange@bangor.ac.uk

Web: ResearchGate

I graduated in Oceanography with Marine Biology from the University of Southampton in 2001. I remained at the University of Southampton for a further three years undertaking a PhD in the reproductive success of Antarctic marine invertebrates from which I graduated in 2005. Following my PhD, I worked as a Marine Environmental Consultant at the Centre for Marine and Coastal Studies (CMACS Ltd) in Birkenhead, Liverpool. Here, I was tasked with undertaking inshore and offshore surveys, laboratory analyses and report writing to inform environmental impact assessments for a diversity of coastal and offshore developments. In 2009 I moved to the Department of Oceanography (Marine Sciences) at the University of Hawai'i at Manoa to undertake a postdoctoral scholarship, where I worked on two projects focussed on the impacts of climate change on ecological processes in Antarctic seafloor ecosystems. Among other things, these projects involved exploring the link between pelagic and benthic systems under changing environmental conditions, and investigating the evolution of seafloor communities in response to changes in ice cover. During this time, I was appointed to a part-time Assistant Professor position and tasked with developing the first Marine Biology graduate programme in Hawai'i. In 2013 I was appointed a Teaching Fellow in Marine Biology in the School of Ocean and Earth Science at the University of Southampton, where I delivered a wide range of undergraduate and postgraduate teaching. Following on from this appointment, I was promoted to Lecturer in Marine Biology and continued to engage in a variety of teaching and scholarship activities across the University. In 2018 I was appointed Lecturer in Marine Biology at Bangor University and moved to the School of Ocean Sciences in Menai Bridge.

I am a benthic marine ecologist, with a specialism in the Polar Regions. My primary research interests focus on using benthic systems as models to investigate marine ecological and biological theory against a backdrop of changing environmental conditions, and evaluating benthic ecosystem responses to climate change. Particular areas of interest include the population consequences of ocean warming on the seasonal and inter-annual reproductive ecology of Antarctic marine invertebrates, and the reproductive resilience of Arctic marine invertebrates to environmental variability associated with changing sea ice conditions (The Changing Arctic Ocean Seafloor (ChAOS)). In addition, I am actively engaged in research that aims to enhance assessment feedback practice in Higher Education. Among other things, this engagement includes my involvement in two HEFCE-funded research initiatives (HEFCE Catalyst A and B) aimed at supporting student agency and success in higher education and beyond. 

Research

Teaching and Supervision

I teach across a range of undergraduate and postgraduate modules in the School of Ocean Sciences. The main focus of my teaching is benthic marine ecology and extreme marine habitats.

I currently supervise 5 PhD students (2 as lead supervisor):

Ben Robinson - The ecology of Antarctic benthic communities down to 100 m depth: Disturbance, diversity and succession. Commenced April 2018. Co-supervisors: Simon Morley - Lead (BAS), David Barnes (BAS), Martin Solan (University of Southampton). NERC SPITFIRE DTP.

Rebecca de Leij - Impacts of rapid environmental change on the reproduction and fertilisation dynamics of marine invertebrates, using an urchin model. Commenced October 2017. Co-supervisors: Lloyd Peck (BAS), Clive Trueman (University of Southampton). NERC SPITFIRE DTP.

Alice Pullen - Variation in predation by soft bodied predators from the tropics to the poles. Commenced October 2017. Co-supervisors: Lloyd Peck - Lead (BAS), Elizabeth Harper (University of Cambridge), Simon Morley (BAS). NERC SPITFIRE DTP.

Christina Wood - Species resilience, pasticity and adaptation to environmental change. Commenced October 2016. Co-supervisosr: Jasmin Godbold (University of Southampton), Clement Garcia (CEFAS), Stefan Bolam (CEFAS). GSNOCS Mayflower Scholarship.

Camilla Cassidy - The effect of environmental variation on species functional traits. Commenced October 2016. Co-supervisors: Jasmin Godbold - Lead (University of Southampton), Clement Garcia (CEFAS), Stefan Bolam (CEFAS). NERC SPITFIRE DTP.

Education / academic qualifications

  • BSc , Oceanography with Marine Biology
  • PhD , The Reproductive Success in Antarctic Marine Invertebrates
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